Dec

04

Siding in Colder Climates

Siding in Colder Climates

If you are looking for new siding, cost, style, and color are probably the first three factors that come to mind. However, the elements should actually be at the forefront of your thoughts because you want to choose siding that is well suited for any type of weather. As we rapidly approach the official start of the winter season, it’s especially important to ensure your home’s siding is durable enough to withstand freezing temperatures.

Your home’s siding is the first line of defense against inclement weather conditions. Since we live in a climate that experiences very cold weather, it’s natural to have some concerns about the material you’re putting on your home. If they aren’t installed or maintained properly, any siding material can experience issues caused by the cold weather.

A primary concern when selecting siding for cold climates is insulation. You want to ensure that your siding can help keep out the winter elements that can drive your utility bills through the roof. Products like composite wood siding paired with rigid foam board insulation or premium insulated vinyl siding are made just for this purpose and create an excellent barrier against the cold. Most types of insulation used with these siding options are formed to fit perfectly behind the siding, leaving no gaps where air or moisture can infiltrate your home. Installing a rigid insulation board under the new siding will also reduce “thermal bridging” where cold temperatures can pass through conductive materials such as wall sheathing and more importantly, wall studs, causing considerable heat loss and discomfort.

Another concern most people have is the freeze/thaw cycle. In cold climates, any moisture that seeps into a material can freeze very quickly when temperatures drop. When water freezes, it expands, which can do serious damage to siding and the structure of a home. While most siding in good condition is fairly watertight, products like cedar wood that is losing its paint or mortar that has some cracks in it can become problematic because water can seep in just enough to freeze and expand. Composite wood siding and premium insulated vinyl siding are made up of elements that are water resistant. These products don’t absorb water, swell, or expand, so you don’t have to worry about how a freeze/thaw cycle will affect your siding over time. In addition to these products, the installation of a weather-resistant barrier, otherwise known as a house-wrap, will minimize moisture intrusion and ensure the materials behind the wall cladding remain dry.

Be sure your home’s defenses are up this winter with proper insulation and siding. Remember, even though the exterior style, color, and look of your home is important, protecting your home from the elements using high quality, durable materials should be number one on your list. Not only will new siding extend the life of the exterior of your home and increase curb appeal, but it can also save you money on your energy bills.

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